Design Guidelines for Wheeled Mobility Accessibility

Design Guidelines for Wheeled Mobility Accessibility

Welcome!

The primary purpose of this website is to disseminate our research findings about the sizes, abilities and space needs of contemporary wheeled mobility device users in the form of visual, interactive design aids.

These design aids are intended to provide technical assistance to accessibility standards committees, government officials and designers to help improve accessibility to the built environment by wheeled mobility users.

We encourage you to sign-up for free to access these design aids presented under the ‘accommodation models’ tab for a design-focused data display, and the univariate and bivariate analysis tabs for a deeper data-dive.


Project Summary

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Wheeled mobility devices are used by people with mobility impairments to support their mobility in buildings and in the community, e.g. manual wheelchairs, power wheelchairs and scooters. During the years 2005-2012 the University at Buffalo’s Center for Inclusive Design and Environmental Access (IDeA Center) collected anthropometry data on 500 individuals who use wheeled mobility devices.

Subsequently, the Inclusive Mobility Research Lab has worked to create this website serving as a visual interface to explore this extensive anthropometry database in a manner that is both, design-focused and statistically rigorous.

We also hope that this website will serve as an evidence-based resource to support development of accessibility standards, address issues related to wheeled mobility accessibility currently not covered in standards, and provide suggestions for equivalent facilitation to accessibility standards where appropriate.


What is Anthropometry?

Anthropometry is the study of the dimensions and abilities of the human body. This information is very useful when designing the buildings, facilities, transportation vehicles, work-places, and equipment in order to accommodate the needs of the end-user. In the case of wheeled mobility, static anthropometry includes measurement of occupants and their devices (i.e., static anthropometry) and of reaching abilities, maneuvering, and other aspects of space and equipment use from a wheeled mobility device (i.e., functional anthropometry).


Acknowledgement

This website was developed with funding by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR; grant #90RE5022-01-00). The anthropometry research for the wheeled mobility database was initially funded by the the U.S. Access Board (contract # TPD-ABA-07-C-001) and NIDILRR (grant #H133E99005). NIDILRR is a Center within the Administration for Community Living (ACL), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of NIDILRR, ACL, HHS, or the U.S. Access Board and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.



Cite this website as:

Inclusive Mobility Research Lab (2017). Design Guidelines for Wheeled Mobility Accessibility. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Retrieved on August 8, 2017, from http://dsouzalab.engin.umich.edu/research/anthro/index.php


Recent Project Updates

January 2017:

Poster presentation on the paper titled "Revisiting Clear Floor Area Requirements for Wheeled Mobility Device Users in Public Transportation" by Aravind Bharathy and Clive D'Souza at the Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board 2017. See Poster.

December 2017:

Paper by Aravind Bharathy and Clive D'Souza titled "Revisiting Clear Floor Area Requirements for Wheeled Mobility Device Users in Public Transportation" has been accepted to the Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board 2017. See TRB Paper# 18-02377.